A Companion to the English Novel by Stephen Arata, Madigan Haley, J. Paul Hunter, Jennifer Wicke

By Stephen Arata, Madigan Haley, J. Paul Hunter, Jennifer Wicke

"Explores the background, evolution, genres, and narrative components of the English novel, whereas chronicling its improvement from the early 18th century to the current day"--

summary:

This number of authoritative essays represents the newest scholarship on issues with regards to the subjects, events, and different types of English fiction, whereas chronicling its improvement in Britain from Read more...

Show description

Read Online or Download A Companion to the English Novel PDF

Similar english literature books

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

The 3rd variation of this unmatched e-book makes a speciality of the real alterations in educational opinion and church association in the earlier few years. widely revised and up to date, it includes elevated assurance on jap church buildings, concerns in ethical theology, and advancements stemming from the second one Vatican Council.

The Mayor of Casterbridge (Cliffs Notes)

Hardy's tale dramatizes the human situation as a fight among strong males and opposed to destiny. (Fate often wins! ) during this story, violent traditional and social forces toss the characters approximately like rag dolls because the mayor is destroyed through his protege.

F.R. Leavis

‘informative, succint, circumspect; an exacting advent to Leavis as an incisive grasp critic. excellent for today’s scholars and basic readers’ – Chris Terry, instances better schooling F. R. Leavis is a landmark determine in twentieth-century literary feedback and idea. His outspoken and confrontational paintings has usually divided opinion and keeps to generate curiosity as scholars and critics revisit his hugely influential texts.

A Companion to the English Novel

"Explores the historical past, evolution, genres, and narrative components of the English novel, whereas chronicling its improvement from the early 18th century to the current day"-- summary: This number of authoritative essays represents the newest scholarship on themes when it comes to the subjects, pursuits, and varieties of English fiction, whereas chronicling its improvement in Britain from the early 18th century to the current day.

Extra info for A Companion to the English Novel

Example text

Her memoir implicitly serves a comparable function. The notion of hypocrisy as usually defined hardly applies. Fanny believes what she says; she has changed her mind as a result of her happy marriage. The narrative has previously emphasized her continued pleasure in the maneuvers and deceptions of her role as prostitute, as well as her pleasure in experience for its own sake. Now her delight in sexual relations with the man she loves provides new perspective. Yet her new morality rings false because she has neither repented nor essentially changed.

If the lack of an objective narrator licenses the reader to draw her or his own conclusions, ­however, it also enables the reader to cheer for the wrong team, potentially compro­ mising the political agenda. The fact that Coke Clifton, the Lovelace‐like libertine with whom we are meant to disagree, is far more seductive a writer than either of Holcroft’s paragons in Anna St. Ives raises problems that would have been familiar to Richardson. Holcroft’s novel, with its Richardsonian plot and sentimental set pieces, endeavors to repurpose the conventions of earlier eighteenth‐century novels.

The tales of Maria – torn from her infant and incarcerated in a madhouse by her vindictive husband – and of Jemima – former prostitute and present attendant in the asylum – are designed to invite sympathy, but Wollstonecraft also wants her reader to recognize that suffering calls for both pity and justice. The novel’s fragmentary structure – the interlarded narratives, the shifts in register from the Gothic to the sentimental to the philosophic to the polemical – interrupts identification, compelling the reader to recognize that the sequential stories are not meant to prolong the pleasures of sentimental reading, but to communicate the fact that each tale is the single instantiation of a general injustice to be traced to structural forces rather than local villainy.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.49 of 5 – based on 20 votes